06.06.2012 Western Sahara: A Negligible Amount?

The Sahrawi people have, in fact, done everything correctly in their struggle to achieve an independent Western Sahara. They embraced their war of independence in 1969, when the anti-colonial movements reached their historic climax. The moment had...

11.10.2011 Rights instead of Compassion for East Africa

We have to understand the roots of tragedies to avoid repetition. The crisis in East Africa is not at all „unbelievable“, as some commentators continue to suggest, the approaching disaster has been foreseeable for years and decades. People are dying not only because of an unfortunate drought but also of systemic, wide-ranging problems such as climate change, the consequences of neo-liberal ideologies, military interventions and unstable grain markets - and because the world of states is unwilling to outlaw and pursue the warlords that have been destroying Somalia for 20 years.

29.09.2011 WorldRiskReport 2011

People are inevitably captivated by disasters. Television, online media, social networks and newspapers report immediately from affected areas. In just the first three months of 2011, the earthquake in New Zealand, the flood in Australia, and in particular, the earthquake and tsunami in Japan provided shocking images. Extreme natural events such as the tsunami on Boxing Day 2004 as well as the earthquake in Haiti and the flood in Pakista n both in 2010 have had catastrophic effects on the affected regi ons. The frequency and intensity of such extreme events have increased alarmingly in recent years. But did the disaster risk also increase?

15.09.2011 Acting fast and sustainable

In 2006 medico, Brot für die Welt, Misereor, terre des hommes and Welthungerhilfe formed the Alliance Development Works ( Bündnis Entwicklung Hilft or BEH in German): It has since been joined by other German partners including Kindernothilfe,...

15.09.2011 Solidarity networks

When the earthquake struck Haiti on 12 January 2010 the capital Port-au-Prince was almost totally destroyed and over 250,000 people lost their lives. In the midst of such an apocalyptic nightmare, emergency aid provided by Haiti's neighbours provided...

15.09.2011 Strengthening self-help initiatives during and after the disaster

When Pakistan was overwhelmed by floods along the Indus and other regions in August 2010, medico’s partner HANDS (Health and Nutrition Development Society) was one of the first civil society organisations on the scene. In the Sindh region HANDS...

15.09.2011 Integrated community development

It can often take many years to assess the long-term effects, if any, of humanitarian aid in post-disaster situations. One example is the situation in Nicaragua following Hurricane Mitch in 1998. There, medico international had been supporting...

15.09.2011 Emergency relief and coming to terms with the past

The coastal village of Tirúa was particularly badly hit by the severe earthquake that devastated Southern Chile in February 2010. Many Mapuche Indians, who were persecuted during the Pinochet dictatorship and also have little voice in society under...

01.02.2011 Odious debts and global responsibilities

From time to time catastrophes remind us of the dangers lurking along the uncertain paths of historical development. Such was the case with the banking crisis which made the destructive potential of neoliberalism clear for all to see. This is also...

01.11.2010 Emergency relief

At medico international ‘critical emergency relief’ means more than disaster management. We provide victims with the support they need to help themselves, jointly reflect with them on the underlying political and economic causes and assist them in coping with the psychological and social trauma.